#6 – plastic paradise. the great pacific garbage patch

This post isn’t directly about personal change, but to share a remarkable video that came to my attention today that fortifies my decision for change and to reduce plastics from daily life.

http://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/video/450695235564/plastic-paradise

Synopsis: Thousands of miles away from civilization, Midway Atoll is in one of the most remote places on earth. And yet it’s become ground zero for The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, syphoning plastics from three distant continents. In this independent documentary film, journalist/filmmaker Angela Sun travels on a personal journey of discovery to uncover this mysterious phenomenon. Along the way she meets scientists, researchers, influencers, and volunteers who shed light on the effects of our rabid plastic consumption and learns the problem is more insidious than we could have ever imagined

The film runs for just under one hour and is available for purchase, digital download and for education at http://plasticparadisemovie.com

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1958 a wooden boat lots of fish – 2008 plastic bottle boat, few fish

A Tribute to Don McFarland by Planet Experts

In 1958, Don McFarland was one of four men who built a 9 ton wooden box and drifted to Hawaii in 69 days. Exactly 50 years later in 2008 I did the same, but used 15,000 plastic bottles with a Cessna 310 aircraft tied on top of it. This trash raft, called Junk, was intended to show the world how trash adrift in the ocean can travel thousands of miles. We rafted more than 2600 miles in 88 long days from Los Angeles to Hawaii.  But in this 50 years the ocean had changed.

Don talked about seeing sharks every day, catching tuna and mahi-mahi whenever he wanted. On our journey, we saw almost no fish, but we did see and ocean polluted with microplastics. I can confidently say that if you are adrift in the ocean today you cannot rely on the oceans bounty to keep you alive. We have overfished and polluted our seas.

What gives me hope, is that when we create MPA’s, or marine protected areas, fish populations come back stronger. When we create legislative policy about plastic products that pollute our oceans and must be redesigned, we find last trash in our seas. When we care, we can change.

Sadly, Don McFarland died last week. Hats off to a man that loves the ocean, and knew a life at sea better than most.

Source: http://www.planetexperts.com/a-tribute-to-don-mcfarland/