#8 – say no to the sticky tape

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During my (continuing) journey to reducing plastics and waste, I find that I am ever-increasingly overwhelmed with the variety of alternate products.  It is truly wonderful.  For example; the pictured soap is not bad.  It washes the clothes reasonably well, although I haven’t tried heavily soiled items.  But moreso, the soap is a surprisingly fabulous organic shampoo.

As I am learning and my behaviour changes, I am naturally tending to question more when looking to purchase any product, like; its packaging, and if the item is really needed, and, at what quantity.

Take the the soaps’ packaging for instance; it is waxy, and I do not know if the waxy paper is made from soybean wax or paraffin; and, is the paraffin derived from vegetable oil or petroleum?  Either way, I am not sure the worms will care for it, and not that I am any expect on worm gastronomy, except to categorically state that they [worms] are not very favourable to onions!

Then, there is the dilemma of staples and the sticky tape that was used to seal the soap and to adhere the label respectively.  The staple – being the natural enemy to the photocopier – recently became mine on the recycle front.  How many staples to you need to make staple recycling viable.

Because such a dilemma required my immediate attention I found the stapleless stapler and the very clever fold the paper without a stapler method.

Happy shopping and please feel free to leave a comment on any ideas / products you have used / found / endorse.

 

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#6 – plastic paradise. the great pacific garbage patch

This post isn’t directly about personal change, but to share a remarkable video that came to my attention today that fortifies my decision for change and to reduce plastics from daily life.

http://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/video/450695235564/plastic-paradise

Synopsis: Thousands of miles away from civilization, Midway Atoll is in one of the most remote places on earth. And yet it’s become ground zero for The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, syphoning plastics from three distant continents. In this independent documentary film, journalist/filmmaker Angela Sun travels on a personal journey of discovery to uncover this mysterious phenomenon. Along the way she meets scientists, researchers, influencers, and volunteers who shed light on the effects of our rabid plastic consumption and learns the problem is more insidious than we could have ever imagined

The film runs for just under one hour and is available for purchase, digital download and for education at http://plasticparadisemovie.com

1958 a wooden boat lots of fish – 2008 plastic bottle boat, few fish

A Tribute to Don McFarland by Planet Experts

In 1958, Don McFarland was one of four men who built a 9 ton wooden box and drifted to Hawaii in 69 days. Exactly 50 years later in 2008 I did the same, but used 15,000 plastic bottles with a Cessna 310 aircraft tied on top of it. This trash raft, called Junk, was intended to show the world how trash adrift in the ocean can travel thousands of miles. We rafted more than 2600 miles in 88 long days from Los Angeles to Hawaii.  But in this 50 years the ocean had changed.

Don talked about seeing sharks every day, catching tuna and mahi-mahi whenever he wanted. On our journey, we saw almost no fish, but we did see and ocean polluted with microplastics. I can confidently say that if you are adrift in the ocean today you cannot rely on the oceans bounty to keep you alive. We have overfished and polluted our seas.

What gives me hope, is that when we create MPA’s, or marine protected areas, fish populations come back stronger. When we create legislative policy about plastic products that pollute our oceans and must be redesigned, we find last trash in our seas. When we care, we can change.

Sadly, Don McFarland died last week. Hats off to a man that loves the ocean, and knew a life at sea better than most.

Source: http://www.planetexperts.com/a-tribute-to-don-mcfarland/

#04 – conscientious cheese. ooh! i mean consequential change

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Trial and learning.

It has became apparent that quite possibly, I was the last person to realise that by reducing plastic bags that I would need a plan for various other types of rubbish and associated disposal.

Some others say that they use (single use) plastic bags in their bins with the view that its recycling – I don’t agree as – it still ends up as land fill or worse, or animals incorrectly consume plastic as a food source. That said, I hypocritically and embarrassingly bought a roll of plastic bin bags. Oh no – sigh – followed by a few recriminating thoughts.

Disclaimer:- purchase does not equal use.  My validation comes by way of having a few wardrobe items, that if they could talk, would collaborate to never being used/worn!

I digress; it was like that the process of thinking, and plastics, became diametrically opposed. (Arguably a bit like the correct use of commas, maybe). And therefore, there would be nothing flawed with an excuse to suggest that I am accustomed to relying on plastics as a convenience.   So not conscientious, and so carrying above my plastic bag weight. Bring back the paper bag, as less must be best, ‘cause for sure, my wardrobe would have no complaint.

The rubbish point is; how to dispose of differing types of waste.

My thoughts wonder to the baby boomers and if they remember, or practice how they managed their rubbish back in the 1980’s.

Currently my real dilemma is how to the cover the cheese now that its opened, if not with cling wrap or a sandwich bag? Maybe it should be consumed immediately with crackers.